Audulus 3.1 arrives for Windows and Linux too!

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Audulus gets just about as cross platform as you can get! Now with Audulus 3.1, Audulus is now available for Windows and Linux too, in addition to Mac, iPhone, and iPad.

“It’s not easy to be multi-platform, but I take pride in offering Audulus on as many platforms as possible,” says Audulus developer Taylor Holliday.

The Windows and Linux versions of Audulus have all the features of the Mac stand-alone version. Audulus for Windows also includes a VST plugin version.

Trial versions of Audulus for Mac, Windows, and Linux are also available. These trial versions have no time limit and can load any patch. To save patches, purchase the full version of Audulus.

Audulus for iOS has also been refined. A new context menu does not require a long-press gesture, making the Audulus UI easier to learn and quicker to use. Support for iCloud Drive makes it easier to share patches.

Audulus is a minimalist modular software synthesizer and effects processor. With Audulus, users can build synthesizers, design new sounds, or process audio. All with low latency real-time processing suitable for live performance.

Audulus for iOS can be used as a stand-alone instrument or in conjunction with Audulus for Mac, for a round-trip workflow between platforms. Begin a patch on the bus ride home and then bring it up on your laptop at band practice later that night – with iCloud functionality, moving between platforms couldn’t be easier.

Audulus 3.1 for iPad/iPhone is available on the App Store for $29.99.
Audulus 3.1 for Mac is available on the Mac App Store for $39.99.

Audulus 3.1 for Windows/Linux is available directly from audulus.com for $39.99. Purchase a single license for both versions.

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Are modulars getting smaller, and is it important?

A question about modular synths and whether or not they are getting smaller or not

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The 432Hz Synth arrives, and it looks very cool, and it’s free

Whilst this claims to be based on Allen Porter’s open source mobile synth, the UI is very different indeed. It looks lovely, so I’ll have to take it for a spin!

Here are the gritty details …

The 432Hz Synth is a Must For Every Music Love Fan Out There!

Features:

  • Oscillator A’
  • Oscillator A Waveforms:
    • Square, Sine, Sow, Revers Sow.
  • Oscillator A Volume.
  • Oscillator A Step:
    • X1 X2 X4 X8 X16
  • Oscillator B’
  • Oscillator B Waveforms:
    • Square, Sine, Sow, Reverse Sow.
  • Oscillator B Volume.
  • Oscillator B Step:
    • X1 X2 X4 X8 X16
  • Modulation’
  • Cutoff.
  • Resonance.
  • LFO Waveforms:
    • Square, Sine, Sow, Reverse Sow.
  • LFO Amount.
  • LFO Rate.
  • LFO mode:
    • Filter, Pitch, Wave.
  • Arpeggiator’
  • Arpeggiator Step:
    • Up, Down, Up & Down, Random.
  • Octaves, 1 To 5.
  • Arpeggiator Rate.
  • Volume Envelope’
    • Attack, Decay, Sustain, Release.
  • Filter Envelope’
    • Attack, Decay, Sustain, Release.
  • Oscillator B Fine Tune’
  • Oscillator A-B Sync.
  • Semis.
  • Cents.

Warning Before Use:
Please Volume Down, The Gain is +10db : )

Also The 432Hz Synth Has No Rules, Only Pure Fun. Enjoy!

Powered by Oren Fridman – Promobeat™. This Synth Dedicated To Mr Allen Porter Behind This Open Source Code. 

And did I mention that it’s free?

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I’ve heard that this will work under gbulator on a palm. Worth trying out perhaps?

I’ll have to give it a chance at some point.

SoundPad

This application ranks in my top 5 for palm creativity. It has got to be one of the most unusal and ambitious uses for a palm handheld device.

SoundPad is an FM Synthesiser for a palm OS PDA. It allows you to create FM synthesised sounds which can then be used be other applications (NotePad and BeatPad initially).

This follows the software synthesis model of having an application which works as a sequencer / or host and other applications which work with the sequencer to provide sounds.

SoundPad runs in under 100k. It allows to create banks of sounds which you can then populate. The first screen is a bit of an admin screen really, giving you bank functions and allocating instruments to slots in the bank.

The second screen is the real eye opener. This screen is where you manipulate waveforms and their envelopes to allow you to create sounds. Each sound can be made up of up to four oscilators. Each oscillator can be set to noise if you choose.

Each wave has an ADSR Envelope. This can be manipulated using the superb interface.

Once you’ve made your sound other applications can access it, such as NotePad or BeatPad.

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