If you’re a CDM reader you’ll have seen this, and if you’re a PalmSounds reader you’ll need to

If you’ve seen this post at CDM today, you may be wondering what’s happening. So I think I should explain really. As you might remember, this year saw PalmSounds hit the ripe old age of 11 years, which is a long time in anyone’s book. Right from almost the very beginning of that journey Peter Kirn was really supportive, and from there we’ve stayed in touch and on occasion I’ve written for CDM.

As of now PalmSounds is moving over to CDM, bringing mobile music and app news to an already great site. You’ll be able to find everything you’d normally expect at PalmSounds at CDM, right here, and of course, if you’re not a CDM reader already you’ll find a whole lot more to read there.

Of course you might be wondering what will happen over here. That would be a good question. To answer that you have to remember that PalmSounds started as my personal discussion on mobile music. It wasn’t really a news site at all, but that’s what it became. Now that I’m moving that part of PalmSounds to CDM, this site will really go back to its roots. It’ll be more about what I’m doing personally with my own mobile music rather than acting as a news site.

So please join me over at CDM from today for everything you’ve seen at PalmSounds and a bright new chapter for CDM too.

Happy Birthday to me! PalmSounds is 11 today

IMG_0007

In years gone by I’ve done more to celebrate PalmSounds birthday, especially last year of course where we celebrated 10 years of mobile music. 11 doesn’t seem like such a big deal perhaps, but in some ways it is even more significant. In the UK 11 is an important age. It’s an age where you move up to big school, where things get serious. Perhaps that’s not the best analogy for PalmSounds, but in a way it’s a good way of looking at mobile music and how things have changed, how they’ve developed and progressed. I think that the world of mobile music has come of age in many ways.

I started thinking about that after MMM2017. That was not only an excellent event, but also pivotal in many ways. It signalled a coming together of so many different aspects and parts of the mobile music world that normally don’t intersect. It was also significant that it was opened with a key note by Peter Kirn from CDM and was closed with me talking about the future, something I plan to revisit in the next week or so.

So I think that PalmSounds turning 11 could be¬†significant in many ways. We’ll see if I’m right.

PS. If you hadn’t guessed it, the cakes above spell “Palm Sounds 11”, if perhaps not entirely successfully. However, like many things with PalmSounds, it was a bit of an experiment.

Palm Sounds OSX widget (update)

It may not be long awaited by many (or even any), but I am going to get this widget done. I hope to get it out in June, but don’t expect too much, I freely admit I am no programmer.

QOTD: What next for PalmSounds?

What do you think Palm Sounds should focus on next?

  • More application reviews?
  • Speculation and rumours?
  • Comment and opinion?
  • How to type posts?
  • Something else entirely?
  • Retro?

Thoughts?

Mobile Music Application Directory

Over the next few weeks / months I plan to compile as complete a list as I can for all the mobile music making applications I know of and can find links to. The final directory will be a post on the blog, but I’ll also make it easily available so it can serve as a reference point in the future.

Once the list is done, if you have suggestions for applications to add to it or think of stuff I’ve missed off, please let me know.

Palm Sounds logo


I’ve been working on this for a little while. I started with a bunch of ideas that just didn’t work, but I think this one does. Let me know what you think and if it makes sense.

Update on Palm Sounds

I thought I’d write about what I’m planning for the rest of 2007…

  • A Palm Sounds web site to contain up to date information on projects / links etc
  • A download page to get palm apps that can’t be found elsewhere
  • A photos page of screen shots of applications
  • An events calendar for what’s coming up during this year and beyond
  • Palm Sounds Mac OSX Widget
  • Revamp of the Palm Sounds store (boo hiss)
  • A regular podcast (well, fairly regular anyway)

That’s just the start really, there is more, but it needs more work. Hopefully some of these things will be up and running in the next week or two.

The Mobile Studio: New Speakers

I ordered these speakers from Amazon a few weeks ago, and they arrived yesterday. They were a little bit bigger than I expected, but aside from that they are an excellent addition to the mobile studio.

The Mobile Studio: Wrap around Applications: Spectrum Analysis


I just bought this app as another component to add to my mobile studio. I have to say it is an excellent application. Brilliantly responsive and really interesting to use. My plan is to use it to analyse the output from my work using my mobile studio to give me an idea on the range of the output. I’m looking forward to using it more in anger.

However, it is not an inexpensive application. I cost me about ¬£20. I don’t mind as I think it is worth it to support developers who put these kind of apps together, and it helps me further build my mobile studio.

Here’s a few more of the technical details though:

The software generates real-time fading frequency spectrum or 1/3 octave ISO bar. An intelligent wave monitor window gives you a stable waveform display. Smart peaking envelopes are provided for music monitor. HandDee features makes speaker system frequency response & musical recordings check a snap.
More HandDee than standalone handheld audio RTA. (real-time analyser)

Features Highlight:

Waveform, fundamental frequency readout, plus either spectrum analyser or1/3 octave ISO bar display.
Fading reveals trends in waveform and spectrum plots.
Transition effect is even better than long persistence phosphor used in oscilloscopes.
Pause function for detailed inspection of waveform or spectrum / ISO bar display.

Other Features:

Waveform Display features

HandDee intelligent display with automatic triggering shows stable sound samples upon receiving stable sound input.
HandDee automatic scaling to expand low level sound signal for easy examination.
Digital frequency readout and marking on spectrum
HandDee fundamental frequency measurement with overtone rejection.
Loudest note display when multiple sounds detected.
Accuracy of about 0.5% or 1Hz, 10 times better than Fourier Transform.
Spectrum analyser & ISO bar Display features
Grid lines can be turned on or turned off.
HandDee musical sound peak power envelop.
1/3 octave ISO bar display.
Analyzer settings
Turn on/off grid lines.
HandDee preset analysis parameters for frequency and time averaging.
Three frequency scale selection.
15Hz-250Hz frequency range for woofer characteristic measurement.
15Hz-4KHz frequency range in monitoring musical performance or recordings.
15Hz-22Hz frequency range for all band response checking of hi-fi systems.

There’s a trial version available at palmgear. Try it out, it is fun to use.

The Mobile Studio: Wrap around Applications: ChordLab


So I’ve bought Chord Lab as part of my extended set of music apps running on my T3.

  • Features a built-in Circle of Fifths
  • Chord Finder
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