Aftertouch • 3D MIDI Controller arrives to join the small group of apps that use 3D touch

I have to say that there haven’t been many music apps that have made use of the possibilities that 3D touch provides. In fact I can think of only a handful aside from Aftertouch • 3D MIDI Controller. The most obvious that comes to mind is Roli’s Seaboard 5D app, but also Ferrite Recording Studio.

I have to admit that I thought that 3D touch would be much bigger for music apps and I’m still slightly confused as to why it hasn’t been embraced in quite the way I’d envisaged. Anyway, enough of that for now, perhaps Aftertouch will change the way that not only users, but also other developers see 3D touch.

Here’s what to expect from the app:

Aftertouch unlocks the musical potential of 3D Touch, turning your iPhone into a velocity and pressure sensitive MIDI controller.

Aftertouch sends MIDI note and control data to other apps, or to external hardware via the Camera Connection Kit or via Bluetooth MIDI. It also includes a built-in synthesizer so you can start making music immediately.

GRID FEATURES

  • Configurable grid dimensions and musical intervals between rows and columns
  • Configurable note display format (MIDI note number, musical pitch, or a combination of both)
  • Easy-access transposition buttons to move the grid by a semitone or an octave

MIDI FEATURES

  • Selectable MIDI output: choose between virtual MIDI destinations (other apps), hardware USB MIDI connections (via the Camera Connection Kit), or Bluetooth MIDI devices
  • Selectable MIDI Channel, or MPE (Multi-dimensional Polyphonic Expression)
  • Configurable CC outputs for X, Y, and Z axis finger movement (with support for Pitch Bend in the X axis, and Channel or Polyphonic pressure in the Z axis)

OTHER FEATURES

  • Built-in phase modulation synthesizer exhibits the default expression settings
  • Velocity curve editor for fine-tuning the velocity- and pressure-sensitivity to your musical style
  • Use the full screen to set the range of control parameters, or constrain them to only respond to movement within a single pad.

NOTE: Z-axis support is only available on devices with 3D Touch. Other devices still send X and Y axis data, and send a fixed note-on velocity value.

Midiflow 2.2.8 arrives

Midiflow gets an update with some nice new features. Here’s what’s new:

  • Send MIDI based on device motion (needs Controller Remapping)
  • Send MIDI data when a preset is loaded (in-app purchase)
  • MIDI learn for almost all values (split points, channels etc.)
  • Tap clock tempo
  • Control clock tempo via MIDI (controller assignment)
  • Improved responsiveness of the UI

24 books for Christmas: 3 – Basic MIDI

Basic Midi is a great starting point for anyone who has heard of MIDI and yet feels completely confounded as to what it is, what it does and how to make best use of it. It has plenty of background and useful explanations. However, it is good for beginners. If you’re an experienced MIDI user then this isn’t going to be nearly as much use to you. I’ll leave it up to you to decide.

You can find it here on Apple iBooks.

ittyMIDI SysEx Manager


ittyMIDI SysEx Manager is a universal SysEx dump utility for the Palm OS.

SysEx Manager can do the following:

Record Bulk SysEx into the MIDI books used by the ittyMIDI Player. With the latest release of Player, you can incorporate these SysEx files into normal playlists. Send Bulk Sysex with the ability to set a time delay between each message to give slower devices the time to process it. The latest version of Songloader, available with the installation for Player, you can load .syx files directly into books for use with SysEx Manager or Player. Send All SysEx Messages located in any standard MIDI file.

Whilst not something that I am going to find that useful I am sure that others would value this application.

Palm Hardware: Tsunamidi

On a theme of old expansion modules, I couldn’t leave out this one. Famed as being the only module with true MIDI in capabilities. This tone module offered a full General MIDI sound set and wavetable synthesis. The Tsunamidi was about the same size as the Palm V Modem. It took two AA batteries and didn’t use any additional power from the handheld.

It had a built-in speaker and headphone jack and a port for an AC power adapter. There was also a special cable (included) that gave you full sized MIDI-in and MIDI-out ports to connect to any electronic music instruments or equipment.

The original box included the Tsunamidi Unit, storage bag, ear-bud earphones, 2 AA Batteries, MIDI-in/out cable, and a mini-CD containing free MIDI software (demo versions only).

Tsunamidi was made by Singapore Shinei Sangyo Pte. Ltd. Here are some nice quotes from the original launch of the device:

“The Tsunamidi product is a valuable and convenient add-on for musicians everywhere,” said T. Nakagaki, chairman, Shinei Group. “Its tools to create and edit music complement the Palm V handheld’s mobility and simplicity to allow musicians to practice their art wherever they are.” “Composing music has been traditionally limited to a studio,” said Byron
Connell, vice president, Consumer Markets Group, Palm, Inc. “The Tsunamidi frees musicians to compose music anywhere with just their Palm handheld and their imagination.”

I did like this unit, but I could never get the MIDI in to work right. However, the sound quality was very good indeed.

Palm and MIDI?


Could these cables be used to connect a palm to a MIDI device? I found these on a post at Create Digital Music I know that the T series aren’t supposed to work with MIDI, but could they? I’d love to know.

MIDI day on Palm Sounds : Roland PMA-5

Ok, this isn’t really a MIDI software review for the palm OS. However, someone asked me this evening if I was interested in buying one of these so I did a little research. Very interesting indeed. I might have to say yes and have a play.

I’d never heard of this device before, but I have to say I am very interested indeed.

%d bloggers like this: