Unexpectedly Meteor Multitrack Recorder from 4Pockets gets an update

A few days ago 4Pockets Audio put a number of their apps on sale, which was the first thing that they’d done with them since 2014. It was good to see that the lights were still on at 4Pockets as I’d all but written them off. That would have been a real shame as they’d made some really amazing apps over the years.

Today we see an update to Meteor Multitrack Recorder, their flagship DAW, and this is great news, really great news. My hope is that we’ll see some updates for their other apps too, like Synergy Studio, and the amazing Aurora and Aurora HD.

It’s worth pointing out that both Meteor Multitrack Recorder and Aurora were originally Windows Mobile apps, so these have some pretty amazing heritage to them, and that’s why it’s doubly great that there’s an update for Meteor Multitrack Recorder.

Let’s hope that this is just the first of a series of updates for these apps. For now here’s what’s new in Meteor Multitrack Recorder:

  • Upgraded the app to 64bit.
  • Fixed a bug which caused a possible crash when exiting the Online Shop
  • Fixed an issue with the MIDI output selection in the MIDI Editor
  • Added a new Ducking & Diving In-App Purchase
  • Added a positioning guide in the MIDI editor for placing & dragging notes
  • Improved the video handling capabilities using the Video Plug-In
  • Added inline popup Mini Mixer and Channel Effects panels

Meteor Multitrack Recorder on the app store:

Pocket RTA Professional from 4Pockets


Pocket RTA Pro is a real-time spectrum analyser for your Pocket PC. I like RTAs, and this one is particularly fully functional.

PocketRTA samples sounds picked up by the built-in microphone on the Pocket PC and then applies a Fourier Transform to the samples to obtain a frequency spectrum. The result is an accurate representation of the sampled sound broken down into its frequency components.

PocketRTA gives total control over input sample rate and FFT length, so you can tailor the display to your needs. Sample rates up to 44Khz allow frequencies of up to 22Khz to be measured. Various display modes include, linear narrow band, logarithmic narrow band, Octave, 1/3 Octave, 1/6 Octave, Sample, SPL and Spectrogram displays with ANSI A and C weighting curves. PocketRTA allows real-time magnification (up to 250 times) of a selected frequency range. The touch screen allows selection of the nearest FFT point giving a display of it”s frequency and decibel level. Up to 64 times averaging and variable decay settings allow more stable readings for fluctuating or unstable input signals whilst our unique noise cancellation system allows you to remove unwanted background noise.

New Features of the Professional Edition:

PocketRTA Pro features the ability to calibrate the display using a 1/3 Octave display in order to compensate for imperfections in frequency response of the internal microphone.

Another new feature is the ability to capture any input signal and overlay it as a reference for a live signal. Captured traces can be saved and later loaded as a reference or exported to ASCII text for use in packages such as Microsoft Excel. You can even take snapshots of the screen which are saved in BMP format.

PocketRTA Pro also introduces a Compare / Transfer mode which allows you to compare a captured input signal against a live trace. The difference between the two traces are displayed using a 0dB reference point making it ideal for calibrating EQ”s. A smoothing option has also been added (wide band averaging) to remove unwanted spikes and make the display more readable.

Another new feature is the ability to capture a peak trace over time. Again this can be saved or exported for use in external packages.

I’ve not had a chance to play with this as yet, but it looks like one of the most rounded RTA apps I’ve seen so far. At some point I will get around to trying it out and then I’ll post a review.

Developer Focus: 4Pockets


4Pockets are the makers of two of the latest applications that I’ve added to my collection of mobile music making software:

StompBox

and, Audio Box Micro Composer:

The applications are quite different in terms of use and intended market, and it makes me wonder where they’ll go next, if indeed they will, as you never know if a developer will leave the market.

I hope they stay, and I hope that they make more applications for mobile music, even if they don’t, here’s to a couple of good solid applications.

Audio Box Micro Composer: A first look…

I had a quick look at this application today. It was interesting to find that the application ran on my old Jornada 568. I had a look at the track arranger and the voice controller. All quite straightforward and easy to use. The pattern arranger was easy to deal with except for using drums. That wasn’t so good.

Overall it is an interesting application. In some ways a bit like Griff, and in others like Bhajis Loops.

I think it is a good application from what I’ve seen so far, but it doesn’t have a lot of new features that you can’t find in other applications.

I have to say that the interface is very nice indeed. I especially like the VU meters.

Audio Box Micro Composer

This is (I believe) one of the few Pocket PC music apps / studios I haven’t really got to grips with. This is mainly because it requires a 400mhz CPU and my old pocket pc runs at about 230.

Anyway, I decided to load it and see if it runs at all, and it does, although with some limitations.

Visually it reminds me a lot of Griff, although functionally it makes me think of Bhajis Loops. Anyway, I plan to play with it some more soon and see how useful it will be on my old Pocket PC.

Here’s some info on Audio Box from the 4Pockets site:

AudioBox is an all in one virtual recording studio and sound creation tool for your Pocket PC. Create your own musical compositions without the need for additional software or dedicated hardware. Inspiration doesn’t always strike whilst sat at your PC, so if you’re a budding musician looking for a quick way to lay down your ideas or want to create complete compositions then this is the only package you need.

The Pocket PC alone does not have the ability to play standard MIDI files. This is because it lacks the necessary hardware support in the form of Wavetable synthesis necessary to achieve this. This means that at best you are limited to playing simple WAV and MP3 files. AudioBox solves this problem by allowing you to create your own virtual instruments which are fully configurable. AudioBox allows you to emulate the sound of classic analog synthesisers which became widespread in the 80’s and are still at the heart of modern music today. Customise the sounds to match your style of music or use the presets, it’s up to you! AudioBox also comprises a digital sampler, a dedicated string pad synthesizer and a drum machine allowing you to create your own customised drum kits and instrument sounds.

Of course having the ability to generate sound isn’t everything… AudioBox is a complete music composition package with both track and score editing. The interface is simple to use, and yet provides a comprehensive range of features.

Audio Box allows you to create up to separate 16 tracks, each track assigned it’s own instrument. An integrated mixing desk allows you to control the overall mix as well as assign multiple effects to each channel. The real time effects include digital delay, reverb, chorus, phaser, low / high pass filters and more.

AudioBox also features the ability to automate instruments, effects and mixer settings using custom controller messages sent from the sequencer. Quite simply this allows you to control settings such as mixer pan and fader settings by simply drawing on a controller graph. During playback these settings are relayed to the mixer in real time.

Audio Box has the ability to work in high quality 44Khz mode or 22Khz mode for some slower models of Pocket PC. The polyphony and number of effects are only limited by the speed of your Pocket PC, so there is nothing to hold you back!

System Requirements

  • 5Mb Storage Space
  • 5Mb Minimum program memory
  • xScale 400Mhz or better processor
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