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13 comments

  1. I so want android to be a great alternative to iOS for music, but watching this video makes me think that switching from my iTouch to android would be like going from lobster to seafood extender on purpose. Whoever that man is doing the demo ain't selling me da shit either.

    Seems that android is going to suffer the same fate as windows – multiple hardware + multiple configs + multiple OS's = poor software environment stabilty.

    Prove me wrong droid!

  2. @uncentered

    “Seems that android is going to suffer the same fate as windows”

    So you're saying Android will end up being used on 90% of all existing hardware? And this is a bad thing because?…

    Droid doesn't need to prove you wrong, you just did that yourself.

    In the meantine, my Ipod Touch second generation which is barely 3 years old is not able to run more and more apps.

    But I agree that Android haven't got as much music apps development as IOS.

  3. I have about a hundred things to say about this video, wow this is hip-hop on your phone? I'm glad to see someone is making an app like this for android, but i don't see how the apps in android could ever get the support of apps in iOS. Will android ever get something like audio copy and paste? I would say not any time soon. I guess you could argue audio copy and paste is not necessary when you can access to your file system (unlike iOS). But in my opinion the android audio app community is about where iOS audio app community was like 3 years ago,… And growing at about 1/8th of the rate. It's like writing music on a ds lite. There are only really a few apps to choose from and you have to hope that they are actually useful apps. And after a certain period of time, everyone just gave up on developing for the ds because the 3DS is coming out. I think most android apps will suffer the same fate, to a lesser extent but it's the same as it ever was. With desktops if you are serious about music its always been best to just get a Mac, seems the same applies to phones. I guess I'm just glad I didn't get an android phone.

    When I saw that guys desktop, it made me realize polar differences between me and an android user in much bolder print. Wow so much clutter,.. Is that how you think?

  4. Yes, android has a ways to go. It's going to take a while for the low latency NDK to be widely available and adopted…

    But “will android ever get something like audio copy and paste”?? Why would anyone want to deal with copying samples one at a time when apps are actually allowed to share data (as they should)!?

  5. just tried it. Latency is still an issue, but not a show stopper. Looking forward to this as a day 1 buy.

    Bare bones, but deep in terms of sample editing and sequencing. Internals – individual sample editing start/end/pitch/cut, recording w/ & w/o quantize, keyboard for pitched samples…. No efx @ the moment.

  6. “But “will android ever get something like audio copy and paste”?? Why would anyone want to deal with copying samples one at a time when apps are actually allowed to share data (as they should)!?”

    I was speaking to the maturity of iOS as a music making platform, not only as singular apps but globally with the availability of intua sdk. I do agree that audio copy and paste would not be necessary if the user could access the file system, that's actually why I said that in my post. But audio copy and paste is something I would still want in android because I copy and paste audio clips all the time on my Mac/Linux/windows boxes. It's actually part of how I have been working with audio for the past few years. I am saying android needs to mature to the point that developers can share components to make the experience of whatever app you are using on your phone, a smooth and seamless experience between devices and apps. Really there is not much to choose from for music production on android. I did not buy any iDevices until the iPhone 4, mainly because I didn't care about what was available in the app store until recently. I am still waiting for that to happen with android. Dont get hung up on the audio copy and paste thing, I find it to be an essential tool, but its really just an example of how iOS developers are working together to make apps that work together in user friendly ways (at least for audio, can't really say that's true for much else).

  7. @ johnnyg0

    I am not really sure how i proved myself wrong, i never said that android hardware wouldn't reign supreme, merely that it would be harder to develop good software on such a potentially disparate platform. In any case it is just some thoughts.

  8. Low cost is the main draw of an Android device, but for an aspiring mobile musician it is a false economy both presently and for the lifetime of any current device. This is an indisputable fact. I smile politely at your new Android handset to save your blushes.

    @johnnyg0
    I would guess an Android device will be obsolete in less than 2 years (and for real – as in properly abandoned, not just unable to run some of the latest apps..)
    Your iPod will run, say, NanoStudio right now – which blows this software clean out of the water.

    As for the video.. now I know what a USB leads are. Dope.

  9. woah guys… come on let's ratchet down the vitriol a bit on all sides. It's just mobile music.

    Yes, there are issues with multiple hardware platforms. That's something that apple is not immune to either – look at all the angry app reviews from 1st/2nd iphone/ipod users.

    I think this:

    http://android-developers.blogspot.com/2010/05/on-android-compatibility.html

    makes some valid counterarguments to the fragmentation meme though.

    I've used an ipod touch for a while, and I definitely enjoy low latency and top quality apps like nanostudio, nanoloop, and jasuto on it. On the other hand, I recently got a droid 2, and it's so refreshing to have a more open computing platform – to be able to see the filesystem and download software right off the web – that's kind of nice.

    The open nature allows for things to change potentially in leaps and bounds. For instance, if they finish the port of supercollider, that could be an overnight game changer. It's also possible to run stuff like nanoloop GB through game boy emulators. I can also install python or Rubato IRB and do some custom sound/interface programming right on the device.

    All in all, android has a ways to go, but it's counterproductive to dismiss it offhand just like it's not so helpful to dismiss iOS as not a “serious musical platform” because of its current limitaitoins.

  10. @Anonymous
    “I guess you could argue audio copy and paste is not necessary when you can access to your file system (unlike iOS). But in my opinion the android audio app community is about where iOS audio app community was like 3 years ago,… And growing at about 1/8th of the rate.”

    Right, right, and that last bit I couldn't really say exactly how fast its growing. But as Android just overtook IOS in marketshares, I could see more and more development going on.

    @uncentered
    “i never said that android hardware wouldn't reign supreme, merely that it would be harder to develop good software on such a potentially disparate platform. In any case it is just some thoughts.”

    How about this thought : Windows, Linux, and OSX can run software on different hardware. Its the job of the OS to provide frameworks to make sure it works the same everywhere. Windows and DirectX does a pretty good job at running complex games on different computers running very different hardware, sure it has its issues, but 99% of the time it works as intended. I don't know why you believe its impossible to develop good software on different hardware, its just not true.

    @rondema
    “I would guess an Android device will be obsolete in less than 2 years (and for real – as in properly abandoned, not just unable to run some of the latest apps..) Your iPod will run, say, NanoStudio right now – which blows this software clean out of the water.”

    That problem is not with Android, but with some device makers. You just need to get a device which can be easily rooted (locked devices are harder to root, but its never impossible), and flash a vanilla Rom once its not supported by the manufacturer anymore. Its comparable to jailbreaking IOS, and its getting easier every day. In some time, its going to be a 1-click operation, although we're not completely there yet.

    I agree, NanoStudio is one of the best mobile music app for any platforms right now, and they even offer their software for Windows and OSX for free (which I find amazingly great!). I wouldn't be surprised to see it appear on Android some day (when Android will have a better audio framework). I wouldn't be surprised also to see most best apps to be cross-platforms like videogames (but like videogames, there sure will be exclusives too)

    @Anonymous
    “All in all, android has a ways to go, but it's counterproductive to dismiss it offhand just like it's not so helpful to dismiss iOS as not a “serious musical platform” because of its current limitaitoins.”

    Amen! 🙂

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